Bryce Canyon

Bryce Canyon Utah

What can you say, Bryce Canyon is amazing. If you have only a short time to visit there are lot of great view points to enjoy but if you have the time, go hiking into the canyons its simply amazing place to see. Either way you wont be disappointed its just simply an amazing landscape.

Bryce Canyon is not a single canyon, but a series of natural amphitheaters or bowls, carved into the edge of a high plateau. The most famous of these is the Bryce Amphitheater, which is filled with irregularly eroded spires of rocks called hoodoos. Perhaps every visitor to the park will spend at least some time marvelling at its four main viewpoints, all found within the first few miles of the park: Bryce Point, Inspiration Point, Sunset Point, and Sunrise Point. Between April and October a shuttle service is operated in this area of the park to reduce congestion.

Bryce Canyon National Park lies on the eastern edge of the Paunsaugunt Plateau in south central Utah. Bryce Canyon National Monument (administered by the U.S. Forest Service) was originally established on June 8, 1923 to preserve the “unusual scenic beauty, scientific interest, and importance.” On June 7, 1924, the monument’s name was changed to Utah National Park and it was transferred to the National Park Service. On February 25, 1928 Utah National Park was changed to Bryce Canyon National Park. Subsequent legislation enlarged the park to its current size of 35,835 acres.

Bryce Canyon National Park is a scientist’s laboratory and a child’s playground. Because Bryce transcends 2000 feet of elevation, the park exists in three distinct climatic zones: spruce/fir forest, Ponderosa Pine forest, and Pinyon Pine/juniper forest. This diversity of habitat provides for high biodiversity. Here at Bryce, you can enjoy over 100 species of birds, dozens of mammals, and more than a thousand plant species.

The canyons and plateau of Bryce Canyon National Park are home to many animals. Park boundaries mean little to the migratory hummingbirds, nesting Peregrine Falcon, Rocky Mountain Elk and Pronghorn which daily cross through the forested plateau and barren amphitheater. The search for food and water leads them to the best place to find sustenance and shelter. Many animals share habitats. Ebb and flow of populations is interdependent on all the members of the wildlife community.

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